Category Archives: Biking

See you later, Alligator… in Shark Valley!

After three days in Miami, it was time for the Everglades. I love national parks, and I can’t get enough of them. I even got a national parks passport this time, and I got my first stamp at Shark Valley. Everglades National Park is the largest tropical wilderness in the U.S. and the park protects the original 20% of the Everglades. With less than 30 miles from Miami to the Northern entrance at Shark Valley, this was a must-see for us.

Shark Valley offers a scenic 15-mile round trip loop through the wetlands with a midway point stop at an observation tower. Along the way, we got to see plenty of wildlife we don’t see in the northeast, most of all ALLIGATORS. They are everywhere, including ON the bike trail. If you don’t do anything stupid, they won’t do you any harm, and they’re really fun to look at.

Bikes were $9.50 an hour per person, a little pricey in our opinion for the bikes we got but it was certainly a fun trip. The air smelled a little bit like Cape Cod in the summer and the marshes looked similar but the wildlife was definitely unique and who wouldn’t want to bike in early February with a nice summer breeze?

IMG_1379

Our friends Urvi and Jesse had done the same bike ride a year before and took a similar picture. Maybe it just doesn’t move? Unsere Freunde Jesse und Urvi hatten im Jahr davor die gleich Radtour gemacht und hatten ein ähnliches Foto. Vielleicht bewegt der sich einfach nicht?

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

IMG_1390

View from the observation tower. Blick vom Aussichtsturm.

IMG_1395

Seen from the tower onto the bike trail. Vom Aussichtsturm aus mit Blick auf den Radweg.

IMG_1401

On the trail back. Auf dem Weg zurück.

 

Nach drei Tagen in Miami war es Zeit für die Everglades. Ich liebe Nationalparks und kann nicht genug von ihnen bekommen. Ich hatte mir dieses Mal sogar einen Nationalpark-Pass geholt und bekam meinen ersten Stempel bei Shark Valley (auf dem Weg zur goldenen Wandernadel mit Band… – siehe Video ganz unten). Der Everglades Nationalpark ist die größte tropische Wildnis in den USA und der Park schützt die ursprünglichen 20% der Everglades. Mit weniger als 50 km von Miami bis zur nördlichen Einfahrt bei Shark Valley war das ein Muss für uns.

In Shark Valley kann man eine landschaftlich schöne Radtour mit einer Schleife von 24 km durch das Feuchtgebiet und einem Zwischenstop in der Mitte bei einem Aussichtsturm machen. Auf dem Weg kann man die Tierwelt bestaunen, die wir im Nordosten so nicht zu sehen bekommen, ganz besonders ALLIGATOREN. Die sind überall, einschließlich AUF dem Radweg. Wenn man sich nicht doof anstellt, dann tun die einem nichts und es ist echt lustig, die zu beobachten.

Die Räder kosteten 9,50 $ die Stunde, unserer Meinung nach ein bisschen teuer für die Räder, die man bekam, aber es war eine wirklich lustige Fahrt. Die Luft roch ein bisschen wie Cape Cod im Sommer und das Marschland sah ähnlich aus, aber die Tiere waren wirklich einzigartig und wer fährt denn nicht gerne Anfang Februar mit einer Sommerbrise Fahrrad?

A view of the original Everglades compared to today. Most of the area was lost to agriculture and urban development. This made me a little sad but I live in an urban area myself. Ein Blick auf die ursprünglichen Everglades im Vergleich zu heute. Die meiste Fläche verlor man an Landwirtschaft und Stadtentwicklung. Ich fand das ein bisschen traurig, aber ich wohne ja auch in einer Stadt.

A view of the original Everglades compared to today. Most of the area was lost to agriculture and urban development. This made me a little sad but I live in an urban area myself. Ein Blick auf die ursprünglichen Everglades im Vergleich zu heute. Die meiste Fläche verlor man an Landwirtschaft und Stadtentwicklung. Ich fand das ein bisschen traurig, aber ich wohne ja auch in einer Stadt.

And a video below for my German readers. This won’t make any sense to my English readers, so please ignore. 🙂 Und für meine deutschen Leser zum Thema Stempel im Pass hier ein Video von der Piefke-Saga. Köstlich!

Advertisements

Back from South Florida

Here we are, with our own coffee, after a night in our own bed, enjoying the comforts of our own home. We had a nice week off in Miami and Everglades National Park. Things are a different world down there and while a week of sun was certainly nice in the middle of winter, we both also realized very quickly that Southern Florida would not be for us long term.

I still need to collect my thoughts but I’m excited to write down memories from our trip over the next few weeks on this blog. With already a few ideas in my head, there will be stories about Miami, Cuban culture, running and biking, activities in the Everglades, nasty Floridian mosquitoes, ranger talks and oddities we observed while down there. I hope you’re excited to read our stories. Until then – ¡Hasta pronto!

IMG_1243

Hier sind wir, mit unserem eigenen Kaffee, nach einer Nacht in unserem eigenen Bett und genießen den Komfort zu Hause. Wir hatten eine schöne Woche in Miami und im Everglades Nationalpark. Es ist eine andere Welt da unten und während eine Woche Sonne mitten im Winter echt nett war, stand für uns auch sehr schnell fest, dass Südflorida für uns langfristig nichts wäre.

Ich muss meine Gedanken noch ordnen, aber ich freue mich darauf, Erinnerungen von unserer Reise in den nächsten Wochen auf diesem Blog niederzuschreiben. Einige Ideen habe ich schon im Kopf, z.B. Geschichten aus Miami, die kubanische Kultur, laufen und radeln, Aktivitäten in den Everglades, die fiesen Mücken in Florida, Ranger-Vorträge und Kurioses von dort unten. Ich hoffe, ihr freut euch, unsere Geschichten zu lesen. Bis dann – ¡Hasta pronto!

My Honest Review of the Downeaster

This blog doesn’t get too much traffic, and that’s fine. I enjoy writing and translating posts, and I’m grateful to anyone who reads along. Every now and then, however, I see in my stats that people stumbled across this blog searching the web looking at my review of the Cape Flyer when we took it down to get to Martha’s Vineyard for Memorial Day weekend 2013. It was an experience but such a slow ride that I would think twice now taking that train again.

So what is it with Amtrak this time? We had it all planned out: a wonderful bike weekend, taking the Downeaster from Boston to Portland, Maine last weekend, riding to Brownfield, Maine to stay in a yurt, then cycling down south for a second night and taking our bikes to Newburyport, Massachusetts on Sunday for a final commuter rail ride home. A great weekend with our friends Urvi and Jesse. We still had a great time. But without our bikes, thanks to Amtrak.

Due to the fact that Urvi, Jesse and I were part of a race committee for a 24-hour ultra race in July, we didn’t really have too much time to plan. The bike trip was originally Matt’s idea as a train ride to the Berkshires and cycling back to Boston over the course of three days. Sounds great, right? It did until we started looking at the details. As it turned out, Amtrak only offered one train a day, leaving Boston close to noon and getting to Pittsfield in the late afternoon with not much time to bike around. Since we wanted this to be a 3-day stint, we figured this wasn’t worth the planning trouble, and we weren’t really up to biking 70+ miles a day.

So plans changed. We settled on a train ride to Maine with the Downeaster, and Jesse mapped out a route. Looking at the schedule and Amtrak’s bike policy, they had a lot more trains to offer there. We were game. Then time passed. After our ultra race was over, about a week and a half before our departure, I booked the yurt and the train tickets for four bikes with Urvi in charge of accommodations for night two. It initially looked like all bike options were sold out with the exception of the 11:35 am train, which would get us to Portland before 2:00 pm with enough time to bike to our yurt. We had it all figured out.

And then on Monday, 4 days before our departure, Amtrak left me a voice mail saying our bikes were cancelled, and that we couldn’t take them on the train. They refunded the bike fees and were still holding our coach seats. Frantically, we all started thinking about alternatives in the midst of a very busy work week. We called around for one-way rentals that could possibly transport our bikes but to no avail, there were no options. In the end, we ditched our bikes, cancelled the coach seats, re-booked our second night, and ended up going to Maine by car.

We still had a great time but Amtrak almost ruined it, and they certainly ruined the week for us when we had to scramble to find alternative solutions, considering one of our accommodations was booked with a non-refundable deposit. We got all our money back for the train tickets but when we tried to find out why Amtrak wasn’t taking any bikes on their trains from July 24 to August 16th with no information anywhere for their customers, we ran against a wall.

So, goodbye Amtrak and Cape Flyer. I gave you both a chance but you lost me. As Rick Steves says: “Until next time, keep on traveling!” Just not by train, at least in the U.S.

Our original bike route. The bikes had to stay at home, unfortunately. Unsere ursprüngliche Radroute. Unsere Räder mussten leider zu Hause bleiben.

Our original bike route. The bikes had to stay at home, unfortunately. Unsere ursprüngliche Radroute. Unsere Räder mussten leider zu Hause bleiben.

Dieser Blog hat nicht so viele Besucher, aber das ist in Ordnung. Ich schreibe und übersetze gerne die Einträge und bin dankbar für jeden, der mitliest. Ab und zu sehe ich in meiner Statistik, dass sich Leute auf meinen Blog verirrt haben, nachdem sie im Internet gesucht und meine Rezension zum Thema Cape Flyer, mit dem wir am Memorial-Day-Wochenende 2013 nach Martha’s Vineyard  unterwegs waren, gefunden haben. Es war ein Erlebnis, aber so ein langsames, dass ich mir echt ein zweites Mal überlegen würde, ob ich wieder mit diesem Zug fahren würde.

Was ist also jetzt mit Amtrak los? Wir hatten alles geplant: ein wunderbares Radwochenende mit dem Downeaster von Boston nach Portland, Maine letztes Wochenende, mit dem Rad nach Brownfield (Maine) um in einer Jurte zu übernachten, dann weiter südlich für eine zweite Nacht und dann am Sonntag mit den Rädern nach Newburyport, Massachusetts und mit dem Pendlerzug letztendlich nach Hause. Ein tolles Wochenende mit unseren Freunden Urvi und Jesse. Wir hatten trotzdem Spaß. Allerdings ohne Räder, dank Amtrak.

Da Urvi, Jesse und ich im Ausschuss eines 24-Stunden-Ultralaufs im Juli waren, hatten wir nicht wirklich viel Zeit zum Planen. Die Radtour war ursprünglich Matts Idee als Zugfahrt in die Berkshires und mit dem Rad über drei Tage verteilt zurück nach Boston. Hört sich gut an, oder? Hat es sich auch, bis wir anfingen, ins Detail zu gehen. Wie sich herausstellte, bot Amtrak nur einen Zug pro Tag an, der in Boston gegen Mittag losfuhr und am späten Nachmittag in Pittsfield ankam und so nicht viel Zeit zum Radfahren ließ. Da unser Abstecher 3 Tage lang sein sollte, wurde uns schnell bewusst, dass es das Rumgeplane nicht wert war und wir nicht wirklich über 100 km pro Tag radeln wollten.

Planänderung also. Wir einigten uns auf eine Zugfahrt nach Maine mit dem Downeaster und Jesse plante die Route. Nach einem Blick auf die Fahrpläne und die Fahrradregeln von Amtrak wurde schnell klar, dass es viel mehr Züge zur Auswahl gab. Wir waren dabei. Die Zeit verging. Nach unserem Ultralauf, ca. eineinhalb Wochen vor unserer Abfahrt, buchte ich die Jurte und Zugtickets mit vier Rädern und Urvi kümmerte sich um die Unterkunft für die zweite Nacht. Anfangs sah es aus, als seien alle Radmöglichkeiten ausgebucht, mit Ausnahme des Zuges um 11:35 Uhr, der uns vor 14:00 Uhr nach Portland bringen würde mit genug Zeit, zu unserer Jurte zu kommen. Wir hatten an alles gedacht.

Und dann am Montag, 4 Tage vor unserer Abfahrt, hinterließ mir Amtrak eine Nachricht auf der Mailbox, dass unsere Räder storniert wurden und wir sie nicht mit in den Zug nehmen könnten. Die Fahrradgebühren wurden zurückerstattet und wir hatten noch unsere Sitzplätze. Verzweifelt fingen wir an, uns Alternativen zu überlegen und das mitten in einer stressigen Arbeitswoche. Wir telefonierten herum und versuchten, einen Mietwagen für eine Richtung zu reservieren, der eventuell unsere Räder transportieren konnte, aber alle Versuche waren vergeblich und es gab keine Möglichkeiten. Letztens Endes ließen wir unsere Räder zu Hause, stornierten die Sitzplätze, buchten unsere zweite Nacht um und fuhren mit dem Auto nach Maine.

Wir hatten trotzdem Spaß, aber Amtrak hat uns fast alles versaut und hat uns auf jeden Fall die Woche vermiest, als wir in aller Hektik Alternativlösungen finden mussten, ganz besonders, da eine Unterkunft bereits nichterstattungsfähig angezahlt war. Wir bekamen unser Geld für die Zugtickets zurück, aber als wir von Amtrak herausfinden wollten, warum man vom 24. Juli bis zum 16. August keine Räder in den Zügen erlaubte und das ohne jegliche Informationen für Kunden, rannten wir gegen eine Wand.

Macht’s also gut, Amtrak und Cape Flyer. Ich hab euch beiden eine Chance gegeben, aber das war’s dann wohl. Wie Rick Steves zu sagen pflegt: „Bis zum nächsten Mal, reist schön weiter!” Nur nicht per Zug, zumindest in den USA.

If you try to book bikes for next Friday, this is what you see. There is no information on the website anywhere to explain why this is happening during the peak summer season. When I booked, the 11:35 train was available, so I booked 4 bikes like anyone else would do. Wenn man für nächsten Freitag Räder reservieren möchte, sieht man das. Auf der Webseite selbst wird nirgends erklärt, warum das in der Hauptsaison im Hochsommer so ist. Als ich gebucht habe, war der Zug um 11:35 Uhr noch frei und ich habe für 4 Räder gebucht, so wie das jeder normale Mensch machen würde.

If you try to book bikes for next Friday, this is what you see. There is no information on the website anywhere to explain why this is happening during peak summer season. When I booked, the 11:35 train was available for bikes, so I booked four like anyone else would do. Wenn man für nächsten Freitag Räder reservieren möchte, sieht man das hier. Auf der Webseite selbst wird nirgends erklärt, warum das in der Hauptsaison im Hochsommer so ist. Als ich gebucht habe, war der Zug um 11:35 Uhr noch für Räder frei und ich habe für vier gebucht, so wie das jeder normale Mensch machen würde.

Leave No Trace: Freedom For One Day

It’s Friday night and I’m home. Exhausted. My life is no different from anyone else who works full time. I know that. But it drains me, especially my commute. While 50 minutes by car each way might not seem like too much to some people, it really takes a lot of time out of my day. I do my best to entertain myself with audio books and NPR, or scheduling my runs right after work to wait out the traffic, so that I feel like I’m doing something worthwhile and not waste away in the car. But driving makes me sleepy, and I try to avoid the car on weekends when I can.

My summer ambition this year was to do one long bike ride a week as cross-training for my running schedule. That bike ride tends to be my commute. 15 miles each way. I love it. While I need to get up at least an hour earlier, I love riding my bike in the morning and after work. I used to bike to work every day with only 4 miles to go each way. While riding 30 miles to my current job every day is not scalable with my running and also the weather, I keep enjoying the break from the daily grind, even if it’s for just one day a week. It’s so worth it.

I created a new category for this blog called Biking and re-tagged previous bike posts. You can now re-read any past cycling trip reports that Matt and I did together in Uruguay, Acadia National Park, on Cape Cod, in Boston or in the Netherlands if you have nothing else to do.

This was taken on Wednesday from a bridge in Allston. Note the skyline in the back. Every time, I see the insanity of I-90 going into Boston from my bike, I'm happy I don't have to be part of it, even for just a day. I use a different highway but it's equally as bad. Das Foto wurde am Mittwoch von einer Brücke in Allston gemacht. Jedes Mal, wenn ich den Irrsinn der Autobahn I-90, wenn die Leute nach Boston reinfahren, von meinem Fahrrad aus sehen, bin ich froh, dass ich Teil davon bin, auch wenn es nur für einen Tag ist. Ich fahre auf einer anderen Autobahn, aber das ist genauso schlimm.

This was taken on Wednesday morning from a bridge in Allston. Note the Boston skyline in the back. Every time I see the insanity of I-90 going into Boston from my bike, I’m happy I don’t have to be a part of it, even for just a day. I use a different highway but it’s equally as bad. Das Foto wurde am Mittwochmorgen von einer Brücke in Allston gemacht. Siehe die Boston-Skyline im Hintergrund. Jedes Mal, wenn ich den Irrsinn der Autobahn I-90, wenn die Leute nach Boston reinfahren, von meinem Fahrrad aus sehe, bin ich froh, dass ich kein Teil davon bin, auch wenn es nur für einen Tag ist. Ich fahre auf einer anderen Autobahn, aber die ist genauso schlimm.

Es ist Freitagabend und ich bin zu Hause. Platt. Mein Leben ist nicht anders als das von anderen Leuten, die Vollzeit arbeiten. Das weiß ich. Aber es schlaucht mich, besonders mein Weg an die Arbeit. Während 50 Minuten für eine Fahrt für manche Leute nicht viel erscheint, nimmt mir das jeden Tag echt viel Zeit weg. Ich gebe mein Bestes, mich mit Hörbüchern und NPR-Radio zu unterhalten oder nach der Arbeit direkt laufen zu gehen, damit der Verkehr später einfacher ist, so dass ich wenigstens das Gefühl habe, etwas Produktives zu machen und meine Zeit nicht im Auto zu verplempern. Aber Autofahren macht mich müde und am Wochenende vermeide ich das Auto, wenn ich kann.

Mein Sommerziel dieses Jahr war eine lange Radfahrt pro Woche als Crosstraining fürs Laufen. Die Radfahrt ist meistens mein Arbeitsweg. 24 km eine Fahrt. Während ich dafür mindestens eine Stunde früher aufstehen muss, genieße ich meine Radfahrt morgens und nach der Arbeit. Ich bin früher jeden Tag mit dem Rad zur Arbeit gefahren, als es jeweils nur 6,4 km hin und zurück waren. Während 48 km jeden Tag zu meiner jetzigen Arbeit mit dem Rad nicht machbar sind, besonders mit meiner Lauferei und dem Wetter, genieße ich die Pause vom täglichen Trott, auch wenn es nur einmal die Woche ist. Es lohnt sich echt.

Ich habe eine neue Kategorie für diesen Blog erstellt, die Biking heißt und habe alle vorherigen Einträge zum Thema Radfahren neu kategorisiert. Ihr könnt jetzt alle vergangenen Radtouren von Matt und mir in Uruguay, im Acadia Nationalpark, auf Cape Cod, in Boston oder in den Niederlanden noch mal lesen, wenn ihr gerade nichts Besseres zu tun habt.

Fietsen, Fietsen, Fietsen: Biking in Noord-Holland

My last post was in March when all I could think about was snow. While the last vile piles remain trying to melt desperately, we haven’t really thought about snow for a while. The month of May took us to Europe for two weeks. We went to Germany for my niece’s confirmation and also spent a couple of days in Northern Holland. It was good to take a break from the routine, especially after the mean winter of 2015 when I wrote eight whiny blog posts in about seven weeks.

It is no secret that the Netherlands are a mecca for bike lovers, yet when we were there, I was amazed again by how great the infrastructure was. We had both been to the Netherlands before, including Amsterdam, and we decided we wanted something new, so we picked Haarlem, a quaint little town about 20 minutes by train from Amsterdam with all the amenities you need while being small and relaxing. One day we spent biking and what a joy it was.

Being creatures of comparison, we all love to look at everything from our perspective. Having lived in the U.S. for 10 years now with many years spent on my bike as a commuter, I couldn’t help but notice a few key differences. Don’t get me wrong, I’m not trying to trash everything and there are some great biking opportunities in the Boston area (I especially love those old rail tracks that were converted to bikeways, like the Minuteman Bikeway) but we have ways to go to and here’s why.

Integration. Everything in the Netherlands is made for bikers and connected. Tiny Massachusetts, for example, is 73% the size of the Netherlands, and don’t even try to compare it to all of the United States. It just doesn’t work. Anyway, in a compact country it’s much easier to connect everything. There are bike lanes everywhere. They are separate from the road (= safe) and even rotaries have special lanes for bikers. And yes, cars stop for you. It was like we had arrived in heaven. One day, we went for a run and found that it was easier to bike than to run due to the fact that the sidewalks were extremely narrow and often blocked by cars and you had to move over into the bike lane as a runner. Interesting, huh?

Mindset. If you think about it, every biker in the Netherlands is probably also a driver. If you bike yourself, you approach the roads very differently by car. You are more alert, you understand bikers and you just get it. In Boston? Not so much. Every time, there is a bike accident here and you read the comments in an article, you can see the animosity between bikers and drivers. I get honked at regularly. Yelled at for being part of regular traffic. I can’t bike on the sidewalk. It doesn’t work like that. Then you would have pedestrians yell at you. During a bike trip on Cape Cod once, a driver yelled at us for riding on a shoulder saying we should bike on the white lane even though there was no room. Where else were we supposed to go?

Logic. Everything in the Netherlands makes sense. I knew the bike traffic lights from Germany but the ones we saw in Holland were even more sophisticated. While there are also dedicated bike lanes in the US, you also often have to share the road with traffic. I do appreciate the bike signs and really trying to make this work but as long as people’s minds don’t accept bikers as part of the traffic, “share the road” signs or bicycles painted in the middle of the road aren’t going to achieve much. I also notice quite often, that a bike lane just ends and then: Where are you supposed to go? I do see that they’re trying here but it’s just not hard enough. Until we get there, go for a bike ride in the Netherlands, you’re going to love it.

Bikers waiting patiently at a light. And no one wears a helmet ever.

Bikers wait patiently at a light. No one wears a helmet. Radfahrer warten geduldig an einer Ampel. Keiner fährt mit Helm.

Dutch traffic lights take it even one step further with a notice that says

Dutch traffic lights take it even one step further than German lights with a notice that tells you to wait: WACHT. I loved it. Holländische Fahrradampeln sind noch mal einen Schritt weiter als deutsche mit einem Hinweis, dass man warten soll: WACHT. Toll fand ich das.

I was most fascinated by this rotary arrangement

I was fascinated by this rotary arrangement. Fully integrated! And look, there is room to stop for bikes IN the rotary without disturbing traffic. Ich war von dieser Kreiselausrichtung fasziniert. Alles integriert! Und schaut, man kann sogar für Radfahrer IM Kreisel anhalten, ohne den Verkehr zu stören.

So nice and smooth!

So nice and smooth! So schön und eben!

Just look at how much sense this makes.

Just look at how much sense this makes. If you come up to this intersection and want to turn right, there is room to pull in without disturbing traffic while letting bikes pass on their dedicated lanes. Wicked smaht! Guckt mal, wie logisch das alles ist. Wenn man an diese Kreuzung kommt und rechts abbiegen will, dann ist da Platz um reinzufahren, ohne den Verkehr aufzuhalten und man kann gleichzeitig die Räder auf dem Radweg vorbeilassen. Ausgefuchst!

Nice try in Belmont, MA. That road is actually wide enough. Why not paint a bike lane here?

Nice try in Belmont, MA. That road is actually wide enough for a bike lane here. Oh wait, that interferes with parking, damn it! 🙂 Schöner Versuch in Belmont, Massachussets. Die Straße ist eigentlich breit genug für einen Radweg. Oh warte, dann kann man ja nicht parken, Mist! 🙂

Mein letzter Eintrag war im März, als ich nur an Schnee denken konnte. Während die letzten fiesen Haufen bleiben und verzweifelt versuchen zu schmelzen, haben wir wirklich lange nicht mehr an Schnee gedacht. Im Monat Mai waren wir zwei Wochen in Europa. Wir waren in Deutschland zur Konfirmation meiner Nichte und dabei auch ein paar Tage im Norden von Holland. Es war schön, eine Pause von der Routine zu bekommen, besonders nach dem fiesen Winter 2015, als ich über sieben Wochen verteilt acht weinerliche Blogeinträge geschrieben hatte.

Es ist wirklich kein Geheimnis, dass die Niederlande ein Mekka für Radenthusiasten sind, aber als wir da waren, war ich echt wieder erstaunt, wie gut die Infrastruktur doch war. Wir waren beide schon vorher in den Niederlanden, einschließlich Amsterdam und entschieden uns, mal etwas Neues zu machen, suchten uns Haarlem aus, ein malerisches Kleinstädtchen, ca. 20 Minuten von Amsterdam mit dem Zug und allen Vorzügen, die man braucht und dazu gleichzeitig klein und entspannend. An einem Tag waren wir radeln und Mann, war das toll!

Wir sind alle Gewohnheitstiere und vergleichen alles gern mit dem, was wir kennen. Ich bin jetzt schon 10 Jahre in den USA, bin viele Jahre mit dem Rad gependelt und somit waren ein paar große Unterschiede nicht zu übersehen. Versteht mich nicht falsch, ich will hier nicht alles durch den Dreck ziehen und man kann in der Bostoner Gegend echt schön Fahrrad fahren (ich finde ja besonders diese stillgelegten Bahngleise toll, die in Radwege umfunktioniert wurden, wie z.B. den Minuteman-Radweg), aber es gibt noch einiges zu tun und hier sind die Gründe.

Integration. In den Niederlanden ist alles für Radfahrer gemacht und miteinander verbunden. Massachusetts ist von der Größe z.B. 73% so groß wie die Niederlande, aber man sollte das lieber nicht mit ganz USA vergleichen. Das geht einfach nicht. Egal, in einem solchen dichten Land ist es einfach leicher, alles miteinander zu verbinden. Es gibt überall Radwege. Sie sind von der Straße abgetrennt (= sicher) und sogar Kreisel haben Radwege drin. Und ja, die Autos halten für dich an. Es war so, als wären wir im Himmel angekommen. An einem Tag gingen wir laufen und stellten fest, dass Radfahren einfacher war, weil die Bürgersteige sehr eng waren und oft von Autos blockiert wurden und man als Läufer auf den Radweg ausweichen musste. Interessant, oder?

Mentalität. Wenn man mal drüber nachdenkt, jeder Radfahrer in den Niederlanden ist wahrscheinlich auch Autofahrer. Wenn man selbst radelt, dann ist man als Autofahrer auf der Straße ganz anders unterwegs. Man passt mehr auf, versteht die Radfahrer und es passt einfach. In Boston? Nicht so sehr. Jedes Mal, wenn es hier einen Fahrradunfall gibt und man die Kommentare in einem Artikel liest, dann sieht man die Feindseligkeit zwischen den Fahrrad- und Autofahrern. Ich werde regelmäßig angehupt. Angemotzt, weil ich zum Verkehr gehöre. Ich kann nicht auf dem Bürgersteig fahren. Dann würden mich die Fußgänger anmeckern. Einmal während einer Radtour auf Cape Cod wurden wir von einem Autofahrer angeschrien, weil wir neben dem Seitenstreifen fuhren und auf dem weißen Streifen fahren sollten, obwohl da kein Platz war. Wo sollten wir denn hin?

Logik. In den Niederlanden ist alles logisch. Ich kannte Radampeln ja schon aus Deutschland, aber die in Holland waren noch einen Schritt weiter. Es gibt in den USA ja auch Radwege, aber man muss sich auch oft die Straße mit dem Verkehr teilen. Es ist ja auch schön, dass es Fahrradschilder gibt und man versucht, dass das alles wirklich funktioniert, aber solange in den Köpfen der Leute die Radfahrer nicht akzeptiert werden, nützen „Teilt euch die Straße”-Schilder oder mitten auf der Straße aufgemalte Fahrräder nicht sonderlich viel. Ich stelle auch oft fest, dass ein Radweg einfach endet und dann: Wo soll ich bitte hin? Ich sehe schon, wie man sich hier bemüht, aber es ist einfach nicht genug. Bis es soweit ist, geht in den Niederlanden Fahrrad fahren, euch wird’s echt gefallen.

Nostalgia Series: Amazing Acadia National Park

When Acadia National Park was mentioned as America’s favorite place over the summer in an article on Boston.com, I started reminiscing about our trip there back in 2007. And yes, it took me this long to write about it. Matt and I love the national parks in the U.S. and have visited many out West, among them Bryce Canyon, Zion, Arches National Park, and Canyonlands in Utah as well as Grand Teton National Park and Yellowstone in Wyoming this past August. Those visits often require extensive travel and time commitments but if you live in the Northeast and are crunched for time, you can get “500 acres of jaw-dropping beauty” in Acadia only 6 hours away from Boston.

Acadia National Park is located on Mount Desert Island with the town of Bar Harbor being a popular tourist destination. Since you cannot take public transportation for granted in the U.S., I was particularly thrilled to use Acadia’s free shuttle system: The Island Explorer. A great way to reduce congestion on those busy roads there! In addition, there is no shortage of activities. Hike up Cadillac Mountain, bike the 57 miles of carriage roads, take a cold dip into the rugged Maine waters, and simply enjoy the scenery in this beautiful national park in New England.

Krombacher commercial. Krombacher-Werbung

This looked like the Krombacher beer commercial. Krombacher: Eine Perle der Natur (a pearl of nature). Das sah wie die Krombacher Bierwerbung aus. Krombacher: Eine Perle der Natur.

Cadillac Mountain, the highest point along the North Atlantic seaboard! Cadillac-Mountain, der höchste Punkt an der nordatlantischen Meeresküste!

Cadillac Mountain, the highest point along the North Atlantic seaboard. Cadillac-Mountain, der höchste Punkt an der nordatlantischen Meeresküste.

Gate to the carriage road. The roads are a 57 mile network of woodland roads free of motor vehicles. PERFECT for biking! Tor für die Carriage-Road (Transportweg). Die Wege sind ein Netzwerk von 92 km in einem Waldgebiet, das frei von  Kraftfahrzeugen ist. PERFEKT zum Radeln!

Gate to the carriage roads, a 57 mile network of woodland roads free of motor vehicles. PERFECT for biking! Tor zu den Carriage-Roads (Transportwegen), ein Netzwerk von 92 km in einem Waldgebiet, das frei von Kraftfahrzeugen ist. PERFEKT zum Radeln!

Remember that time when Bush was president? Erinnert ihr euch noch, als Bush Präsident war?

Remember that time when Bush was president? Erinnert ihr euch noch, als Bush Präsident war?

Als Acadia National Park im Sommer als der Lieblingsort der Amerikaner in einem Artikel auf Boston.com bezeichnet wurde, dachte ich an unsere Reise dorthin 2007. Und ja, es hat so lange gedauert, bis ich darüber etwas schreibe. Matt und ich lieben die Nationalparks in den USA und waren schon in vielen im Westen, unter anderem Bryce Canyon, Zion, Arches National ParkCanyonlands in Utah sowie Grand Teton Nationalpark und Yellowstone in Wyoming jetzt gerade im August. Oft muss man dafür sehr weit reisen und braucht viel Zeit, aber wenn man im Nordosten wohnt und nicht genug Zeit hat, dann bekommt man in nur 6 Stunden von Boston entfernt in Acadia 500 Hektar an atemberaubender Landschaft geboten.

Acadia National Park befindet sich auf der Mount-Desert-Insel mir dem Ort Bar Harbor als beliebtem Touristenziel. Da in den USA öffentliche Verkehrsmittel nicht immer selbstverständlich sind, war ich noch begeisterter von dem kostenlosen Shuttle dort, dem Island Explorer. Eine super Möglichkeit, den Verkehr auf den vielbefahrenen Straßen dort zu reduzieren. Aktivitäten gibt es auch genug. Eine Wanderung zum Cadillac Mountain, 92 km an Kieswegen zum Fahrradfahren, Baden im kalten und wilden Wasser von Maine und einfach eine tolle Landschaft in diesem schönen Nationalpark in Neuengland.

Sand Beach, the only sandy beach in Acadia National Park. The water was bitterly cold. There was even a sign saying: Swimming is only for the hardy. Sandy Beach, der einzige Sandstrand im Acadia Nationalpark. Das Wasser war eiskalt. Es stand sogar ein Schild da mit dem Schwimmhinweis: Nur die Hadde komme in de Gadde (oder so ungefähr).

Sand Beach, the only sandy beach in Acadia National Park. The water was bitterly cold. There was even a sign saying: Swimming is only for the hardy. Sandy Beach, der einzige Sandstrand im Acadia Nationalpark. Das Wasser war eiskalt. Es stand sogar ein Schild da mit dem Schwimmhinweis: Nur die Hadde komme in de Gadde (oder so ungefähr).

Climbing on the cliffs next to the ocean... Auf den Klippen direkt am Meer herumklettern...

Climbing on the cliffs next to the ocean… Auf den Klippen direkt am Meer herumklettern…

More ocean view. Mehr Meeresblick.

More ocean view. Mehr Meeresblick.

We made a fire. And it looked like a face burning. Wir haben ein Feuer gemacht und es sah aus wie ein brennendes Gesicht.

We made a fire. And it looked like a face burning. Wir haben ein Feuer gemacht und es sah aus wie ein brennendes Gesicht.

The Best Things In Life Are Free: Boston Bike Party

It was a totally unexpected event and an awesome way to spend a night out in Boston. Yesterday, I got a text from my friend Sarah inviting me to Le Tour de Flags, part of Boston Bike Party. Apparently, people get together once a month and ride the streets of Boston under a certain theme. This time, it was a flag event with people dressing up and bringing flags of their country of choice. Guess which flag I brought! 🙂

The route was 9.6 miles through some of Boston’s most diverse neighborhoods. More than a casual biking pace, this was a little too slow for me, and the break at the Fens was too long but I had fun overall. Highlights included a full moon, music, weirdly dressed up people, cheering crowds, doing circles at the reflecting pool near the First Church of Christ, Scientist (see video, minute 1:37), taking over Boylston Street, cycling over the Boston Marathon finish line, and the Mass Ave Bridge at night, which is always a pleasure on a summer night.

Find Sarah and me at minute 1:33. Findet Sarah und mich bei Minute 1:33.

Es war ein ganz unerwartetes Event und ein toller Abend in Boston. Gestern bekam ich eine SMS von meiner Freundin Sarah, die mich zur Le Tour de Flags, Teil der Boston Bike Party, einlud. Scheinbar treffen sich hier die Leute einmal im Monat und radeln unter einem bestimmten Thema durch die Straßen von Boston. Diesmal war das Thema Fahnen, wobei sich jeder fahnengemäß verkleiden und eine Landesfahne nach Wahl mitbringen konnte. Welche Fahne hatte ich wohl dabei? 🙂

Die Strecke war 15,5 Kilometer lang und ging durch einige der multikulturellsten Viertel in Boston. Das Tempo war ein bisschen zu gemütlich für mich und die Pause in den Fens zu lang, aber ich hatte trotzdem Spaß. Höhepunkte waren ein Vollmond, Musik, komisch verkleidete Menschen, jubelnde Zuschauer, beim Reflexionsbecken in der Nähe der First Church of Christ, Scientist im Kreis zu fahren (siehe Video, Minute 1:37), die Übernahme von Boylston Street, mit dem Rad über die Zielline des Boston Marathons zu fahren und die Mass-Ave-Brücke bei Nacht, die an einem Sommerabend immer wieder toll ist.

Ready?

Ready? Fertig? Photo credit: Sarah C.-S.